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Home » Education » Mediation, Crisis and Conflict Prevention. CSS ETH Zurich

Mediation, Crisis and Conflict Prevention. CSS ETH Zurich

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In the field of mediation, the CSS combines basic research with process support and training programs. Our diverse set of publications on mediation and conflict resolution benefit greatly from these synergies. Here is a collection of our publications from 2018.Publications

The Use of Smart Pressure to Resolve Civil Wars

In this new CSS Policy Perspective, The Use of Smart Pressure to Resolve Civil Wars, Allard Duursma argues that pressure to end conflicts should be used carefully, and only in certain situations. What Duursma calls smart pressure entails the use of pressure from the chief mediator only once the conflict parties have reached a point where they can accept the final outlines of a resolution.

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CSS Analyses in Security Policy No. 236: Long-distance Relationships: African Peacekeeping

In Africa, the UN not only increasingly collaborates with the African Union and other African regional organizations in peacekeeping operations, but often also the European Union. These inter-organizational peacekeeping arrangements enable the UN to share the burden for peacekeeping in Africa. However, Somalia and Mali illustrate that they face political and operational challenges.

To the publication

CSS Analyses in Security Policy No. 229: Swiss Experiences in Addressing Religion in Conflict

Promoting peaceful ways of addressing violent political conflict with religious dimensions is an integral part of Swiss peace policy. It is rooted in the country’s rich history of conflicts related to the coexistence of religious communities. These experiences led to norms of solving problems on a practical and local level in a consensual and collaborative manner that have shaped Switzerland’s political culture.

To the publication

Rethinking Mediation: Resolving Religious Conflicts

Non-religious conflicts declined in the 1990s and their occurrence has broadly flattened out since. This CSS Policy Perspective argues this indicates that classical conflict resolution approaches are generally working. Except, that is, when it comes to conflicts in which one or more of the issues being fought over have a religious dimension. Such conflicts have not only on been on the rise since the late 1970s, they now account for a majority of all armed conflicts. So how should conflict resolution approaches respond?

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Religion in Conflict and Peacebuilding: Action Guide

This publication provides guidance on how to understand the religious dimensions of conflict and take them into consideration in peacebuilding. More specifically, the text 1) examines key definitions and principles; 2) offers a systematic method for identifying and collecting data on how religion contributes to driving conflict and may assist in peacebuilding; and 3) provides case studies from Chad, Northern Ireland, Myanmar, Syria and Thailand to illustrate how each step of this method works.

To the publication

Reflections by Practitioners: Worldview Conflicts about the Role of Women in Society: Dilemmas for Third Parties

Interventions into conflicts about women’s roles in society that involve actors with different worldviews face a key dilemma. Such interventions typically call for third parties to be non-judgmental so they can help bridge existing worldview divides. However, working on the role of women also typically involves efforts to change societal norms to help empower women. To help address this dilemma, this publication draws on the insights gathered at a workshop that took place in October 2017. More specifically, it does so by clarifying key concepts and outlining five essential issues third party actors should consider when building approaches to worldview conflicts about the role of women.

To the publication

Addressing Religion in Conflict. Insights from Myanmar

This paper highlights key insights drawn from three case studies on initiatives that attempted to address interfaith tensions in Myanmar following the outbreak of violence in 2012. In particular, the insights are given in response to five questions frequently asked by peacebuilders facing conflicts with religious dimensions, including 1) how does religion drive conflict; 2) how do we address religion in conflict; 3) how do we work on religion in conflict without making it worse, and more. While the insights are context specific, they also provide relevant lessons for the wider community of practitioners and policy makers working on peace, conflict and religion.

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Deterring Delinquents with Information. Evidence from a randomized poster campaign in Bogotá

This publication provides guidance on how to understand the religious dimensions of conflict and take them into consideration in peacebuilding. More specifically, the text 1) examines key definitions and principles; 2) offers a systematic method for identifying and collecting data on how religion contributes to driving conflict and may assist in peacebuilding; and 3) provides case studies from Chad, Northern Ireland, Myanmar, Syria and Thailand to illustrate how each step of this method works.

To the publication

Explaining Recidivism of Ex-combatants in Colombia

What determines the recidivism of ex-combatants from armed conflicts? In postconflict settings around the world, there has been growing interest in reintegration programs that aim to prevent ex-combatants from returning to illegal activities or to armed groups, yet there is still little known about those who decide to ‘‘go bad.’’ This article evaluates explanations for recidivism related to combatant experiences and common criminal motives. More specifically, it does so by combining data from a survey of ex-combatants from various armed groups in Colombia with police records that indicate which among the respondents returned to belligerent or illegal activities.

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Community Counts: The Social Reintegration of Ex-combatants in Colombia

Community-level programs to reintegrate ex-combatants into society are based on the theory that the participation of ex-combatants in communities can promote reconciliation and minimize recidivism. This article evaluates community and security-related opportunities for and constraints on social reintegration using a survey of ex-combatants from Colombia. It concludes that the characteristics of communities are critical in determining where there are higher rates of participation in social organizations. Further, it finds that ex-combatants are more likely to participate in communities, and feel less of a need to organize among themselves, when civilian community members themselves participate at higher rates.

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Publications in German

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